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News Item: Homepage

Misplaced monarchs: Clusters of butterflies stuck up north


A large population of already vulnerable monarch butterflies are stuck in Canada and in the Northeast. They are late on their migration south _ they should be in Texas at this time _ because unusually warm weather delayed their flight and now winds and other factors aren't making it easy or maybe even possible to go south before the coming frost. (Darlene Burgess via AP)

 

Monarch butterflies, those delicate symbols of spring and summer, should mostly be in Texas by now, winging their way to Mexico for the winter. But Darlene Burgess keeps seeing colorful clusters of them — and she lives in Canada. "As nice as this is to see, I really wish I wouldn't see it because they're running out of time," said Burgess, who does evening monarch counts at Point Pelee National Park in Canada. "It's really not good for them." It's not just Canada. Swarms have been seen elsewhere, including near Cape May , New Jersey, at levels more normal for late September and early October.

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Posted by: Steven Sanders Published:11/2/17
Audience: Homepage and Homepage